Eugene Onegin

Told in three acts and seven scenes and utilizing a stark empty set, Eugene Onegin is filled with Tchaikovsky’s most dramatic music rich in emotions that was effectively sung by this wonderful cast. Besides the wonderful turn by Mariusz Kwiecien, we enjoy fine work by Jill Grove as the nanny Filipyevna with Alisa Kolosova singing Olga beautifully. The Lyric Chorus sounded terrific and Tchaikovsky’s music was nicely conducted by Alejo Perez.

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The Kid from Brooklyn: The Danny Kaye Story

The musical is a pastiche of Kaye on and off stage, with little in tone or
impact to differentiate between the two. The best parts include his most
famous performances of such songs as “Deenah,” “Stanislavsky, ” “Anatole
of Paris,” “Mad Dogs and Englishmen,” and “Minnie the Moocher.” His best
on-stage moment is an emotional one with wife Sylvia after discussing the
possibility of children, when they embrace and dance, tenderly and
suggestively, to “Ballin’ the Jack.”

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Gentle

By today’s psychological and social standards the Pawnbroker is—a narcissist—a misogynist—a cruel and autocratic husband! To Dostoevsky—perhaps the same. But there is something more to him, Dostoevsky shows us, as he compassionately winds us through the inchoate abyss of his modern soul—a soul modern psychology and sociology has since imperialized like topographers with signs and calculations and categories

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The Columnist

He was a powerful voice of the Washington Establishment and a close personal friend of president John F. Kennedy who frequently came to Alsop’s home for a drink and advise. He was both beloved and feared as he was a fierce Cold Warrior who coined the term “Domino Theory” to explain the spread of Communism in Southeast Asia. During the Vietnam War, Alsop advised Kennedy to fight the Viet Cong fiercely. But as the 60’s dawn and after Kennedy is assassinated, Alsop suffers as America undergoes dizzying change that catches Alsop becoming embroiled both politically and personally.

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Carmen – 2017- Lyric Opera of Chicago

The story revolves around a Spanish gypsy (the wild free-loving Carmen, played seductively by mezzo-soprano Ekaterina Gubanova) and the man she takes as a lover, a Spanish corporal, Don José (The powerful tenor Joseph Calleja). He is an upright but flawed man, with a mother and would-be fiancée in his home village; quick to temper and impulsive, when he shirks the advances of the beautiful gypsy, she finds him irresistible and throws a rose at him, striking him between the eyes. Having bewitched him, Carmen convinces Don José to go to prison in her stead; upon his release, he finds her, and she wants to run away together.

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My Brothers Keeper – The Story of the Nicholas Brothers

Kudos to Rueben D. Echoles for creating such a wonderful, groundbreaking. bio-musical!. As the book writer, director and one of two outstanding actor/dancers (he plays Harold Nicholas) Echoles’ has created one of the best shows ever at the Black Ensemble Theater. Besides writing, directing, costumes, choreography, he wrote eight original songs that were fine show-specific tunes. Add Echolas’ terrific dancing and this show is truly Echoles’ opus!.

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The Invention of Morel

To me, this musical surrealism didn’t engage me and quickly became tedious and over produced. It was a long 90 minute one act opera. I’m just too much of a traditionalist to appreciate surrealism in opera. The Invention of Morel could be a treat for lovers of modern, experimental opera? But traditionalist will not appreciate it. But since there seems to be an audience for musical surrealism, The Invention of Morel could appeal to their tast

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