Over the River and Through the Woods

Over the River and Through the Woods (to grandmother’s house, of course, just as the song proclaims) is a delightful tale of reaching maturity at any age. Nick (Stephen Kaiser) visits his four adoring Italian grandparents to inform them that he has just gotten a wonderful promotion. There is only one caveat — he will now have to move far away from them, across the country to Seattle.

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God of Isaac – Florida Review

Isaac is not a heroic figure — not Tom from the Glass Menagerie, not the Marlon Brando character from On The Waterfront, not Huck Finn fishing along the Mississippi, not Professor Higgins or Colonel Pickering from My Fair Lady. But all of these (often introspective) persona (and others) interrupt –and yet reinforce — the plot with their famous and familiar lines altered to reflect his struggle (complete with unexpected yet hilarious yiddishisms).

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Wiesenthal

The play opens in 2003, on the day Wiesenthal is closing down his Vienna office after 58 years of sleuthing which brought down 1,100 Nazi war criminals (although he later laments that this was only 5% of the total). He is a man not filled with passion for revenge — but with passion for Justice. On this last day, as he packs up his memorabilia, he addresses the audience as if we were touring American students on a visit, taking time to inform us, although he had promised his wife to curtail his teaching.

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Respect: A Musical Journey of Women

But idea, no matter how brilliant, is nothing without execution, and the four golden-voiced, charismatic and sure-footed singer/dancer/actors — Carol Bordonada, Nicole Kinzel, Sharyn Peoples, and Ziarra Washington — never miss a note, a beat, a step, or timing in their infinitely varied solos, medleys, trios, and quartets. Props are deceptively simple and effective: a quilt, shiny white boots, red boas, all underscoring appropriate lyrics. In addition, two screens emphasize the message with filmed portraits ranging from Betty Boop to Rosa Parks.

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The Table

What a unique and charming expedience to enjoy this one-man — no really one-puppet — show, purportedly covering the last 12 hours in the life of Moses (in real time). The task is no more outrageous than the clever cavorting of the crotchety puppet narrator who — although he has been told he looks Jewish — assures us that he is not made of kosher cardboard. One puppet plus one bare table creates an entire dramatic world.

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